pussy-pat:

christel-thoughts:

this is what i just picked up from the grocery store. it cost $32. Thirty. two. dollars. for 1 pineapple, 2 bags of grapes, a small container of raspberries, 1 soft drink and 2/$1 nuts…. 
do you know how much junk food i could have for $32? do you have any clue how much McDonald’s you can get for $32?
stop shaming fat people poorer than you or people poorer than you in general for not eating healthier. stop lying about how cheap it is or how it’s comparable to fast food. just stop.

!!!!!!!

Ugh, ugh, ugh, ugh.
I used to cook for 6-8 people several times per week, so seeing posts claiming that healthy eating barriers are caused by food prices seriously bothers me, especially when something like soda is included (and the label is conveniently flipped so it looks kind of like water, weird!) and pricey items like $21 in grapes are used to bulk up the price ($21/$32 = 65% of the price??!?).
So one thing is, food prices aren’t a good argument for why it’s hard for poorer people to access healthy food.  I’ve spent three plus years shopping for myself and others in three states and two countries now, West coast, East coast, and now upper Midwest in the US, plus Japan on both the main island and a smaller, more isolated island, so even though I don’t have a full picture of all of the US or the rest of the world other than that, I have experience both in places where farming is local (less shipping costs for produce) and in places where single mangoes cost $40+.
Healthy, cheap food exists in abundance…but only if you know what to look for and how to cook it.  It’s pretty easy to buy things like spinach ($3-$4 a bag), tomatoes (harder to estimate, but probably $5 worth), chicken (price varies on cut, let’s estimate $15 worth), pasta ($2-3), and some sort of canned sauce ($1-$3, can be 60 cents if you coupon or buy on sale), for instance, and make a good meal that costs about $30, give or take, for around 4-6 people.  So here’s the problem with this: it takes time to cook (1-2 hours per day for me), practice to not waste food and to learn recipes, and lots of time to shop for the right stuff or even to know what the right stuff to buy is (if you have access to a grocery store).  In addition, food costs tend to be higher per person with fewer people (living alone or a couple eating together) than for many people when cooking, which probably hurts young students and people just beginning to work while living away from family.  This means a college student will have a very different experience from a parent with several children when it comes to food costs.
Not everyone knows how to feed themselves a balanced diet.  A lot of people don’t know how to cook or what to eat.  The picture above, for instance, is not a meal.  It wont feed a family or hungry kids adequately because it’s heavily fruit oriented, includes at least one item that is incredibly unhealthy (bottled soda, which is actually 2-2.5 servings per bottle like that if you’re getting the non-diet version), and items used for snacking (snack sized peanuts).  This is a partially because we’re not very well educated on food or nutrition, might be because cooking is viewed as “women’s work” and is undervalued by society, and because of the time commitment involved with cooking.
Bottom line is, there are a lot of better and more applicable arguments on what barriers there are to healthy food access to low income individuals and families.  A lot of these arguments don’t seem to make it on tumblr and quite a few of the posts that do go around don’t seem to include information from the perspective of the providers of families (parents, legal guardians, in other words, people who are in charge of not only their own welfare, but the welfare of children as well). This means that the discussion on food isn’t one that can generate solutions to problems and might even make problems worse by generating bad solutions (example: lowering food prices = lowering the amount of pay to people who are involved with getting food on shelves, including workers who are already underpaid or taken advantage of).
tldr; Why low income households don’t buy healthy food probably has more to do with how hard it is to cook, bad food education in the US, and sexist values rather than food prices.

pussy-pat:

christel-thoughts:

this is what i just picked up from the grocery store. it cost $32. Thirty. two. dollars. for 1 pineapple, 2 bags of grapes, a small container of raspberries, 1 soft drink and 2/$1 nuts…. 

do you know how much junk food i could have for $32? do you have any clue how much McDonald’s you can get for $32?

stop shaming fat people poorer than you or people poorer than you in general for not eating healthier. stop lying about how cheap it is or how it’s comparable to fast food. just stop.

!!!!!!!

Ugh, ugh, ugh, ugh.

I used to cook for 6-8 people several times per week, so seeing posts claiming that healthy eating barriers are caused by food prices seriously bothers me, especially when something like soda is included (and the label is conveniently flipped so it looks kind of like water, weird!) and pricey items like $21 in grapes are used to bulk up the price ($21/$32 = 65% of the price??!?).

So one thing is, food prices aren’t a good argument for why it’s hard for poorer people to access healthy food.  I’ve spent three plus years shopping for myself and others in three states and two countries now, West coast, East coast, and now upper Midwest in the US, plus Japan on both the main island and a smaller, more isolated island, so even though I don’t have a full picture of all of the US or the rest of the world other than that, I have experience both in places where farming is local (less shipping costs for produce) and in places where single mangoes cost $40+.

Healthy, cheap food exists in abundance…but only if you know what to look for and how to cook it.  It’s pretty easy to buy things like spinach ($3-$4 a bag), tomatoes (harder to estimate, but probably $5 worth), chicken (price varies on cut, let’s estimate $15 worth), pasta ($2-3), and some sort of canned sauce ($1-$3, can be 60 cents if you coupon or buy on sale), for instance, and make a good meal that costs about $30, give or take, for around 4-6 people.  So here’s the problem with this: it takes time to cook (1-2 hours per day for me), practice to not waste food and to learn recipes, and lots of time to shop for the right stuff or even to know what the right stuff to buy is (if you have access to a grocery store).  In addition, food costs tend to be higher per person with fewer people (living alone or a couple eating together) than for many people when cooking, which probably hurts young students and people just beginning to work while living away from family.  This means a college student will have a very different experience from a parent with several children when it comes to food costs.

Not everyone knows how to feed themselves a balanced diet.  A lot of people don’t know how to cook or what to eat.  The picture above, for instance, is not a meal.  It wont feed a family or hungry kids adequately because it’s heavily fruit oriented, includes at least one item that is incredibly unhealthy (bottled soda, which is actually 2-2.5 servings per bottle like that if you’re getting the non-diet version), and items used for snacking (snack sized peanuts).  This is a partially because we’re not very well educated on food or nutrition, might be because cooking is viewed as “women’s work” and is undervalued by society, and because of the time commitment involved with cooking.

Bottom line is, there are a lot of better and more applicable arguments on what barriers there are to healthy food access to low income individuals and families.  A lot of these arguments don’t seem to make it on tumblr and quite a few of the posts that do go around don’t seem to include information from the perspective of the providers of families (parents, legal guardians, in other words, people who are in charge of not only their own welfare, but the welfare of children as well). This means that the discussion on food isn’t one that can generate solutions to problems and might even make problems worse by generating bad solutions (example: lowering food prices = lowering the amount of pay to people who are involved with getting food on shelves, including workers who are already underpaid or taken advantage of).

tldr; Why low income households don’t buy healthy food probably has more to do with how hard it is to cook, bad food education in the US, and sexist values rather than food prices.

(via biolosophy-grainofrice)

Becomes adult with office and reliable stream of income…

…proceeds to buy twenty pillowpets to put in office and $80 worth of adventure time dvds before first paycheck…

luckyfilbert:

You can submit until Monday, September 15. Go to fcc.gov/comments and submit a comment on, I believe, forms 14-28, 10-127, and 14-57.

please please please do not be worried that you have to write something beautiful to persuade them. Just submit SOMETHING. These are going…

beautifuloutlier:

I want to note that the way the sex binary looks like it’s present throughout the animal world is that white scientists have a terrible habit of labeling everything “male” or “female” even when it makes no sense.

Like, by any reasonable metric, bees have three sexes:…

My biology degree is actually useful for once!

So, in biology, sex is usually defined by gamete size (the cells used in sexual reproduction that fuse together to form a new organism—in humans eggs and sperm) and, to some extent, genetics.  The female sex has the larger gamete, while the male sex has smaller gamete.  Typically larger gametes are associated with greater investment in the offspring (so the female is usually the one that’s pregnant or takes care of the eggs), however, this isn’t always the case and male organisms sometimes make a greater investment in offspring than the female (seahorses!).

Although this is the definition for distinguishing sex in a lot of multi-celled organisms, there are some organisms (mostly fish, from what I’m aware) that can undergo hormone changes that allow them to switch between sexes, usually this occurs in a “harem” groups, where there is one male that protects many females from threats and basically offers safety for the females in exchange for the females allowing the male to fertilize their eggs. The male usually has a pretty short life, since it usually gets really flashy coloration when it turns male, so when the male dies, a female fish will take the male’s place and undergo hormonal changes, then take over the harem.  In some cases, there are also some sneaky male fish that look like females and fertilize some or all of the eggs before the dominant male is able to.

One of my professors was actually a bee expert, but, unfortunately, his main interest was in honey bee water collection and genetics, so some of this may not be totally accurate (bee experts, please do correct me if I say something that’s wrong!), but I think that the reason why worker bees are classified as female is because they are able to lay eggs in some circumstances.  Since the eggs are unfertilized and can only develop into male drones, a colony can’t survive with only laying worker bees and need a queen, but because the worker bees are genetically the same as queen bees (drones only have one set of chromosomes) and they can have gametes, which are eggs, they’re considered female in this case.

As far as I know, there are no mammals that can asexually reproduce (except in laboratory studies where genetics were manipulated), though there are some vertebrates that can. There is a species of lizard (the New Mexico whiptail) that exclusively reproduces asexually and is considered all female. There are a few issues with categorizing these lizards as female, since only one sex seems to exist in the species.  So the issue here is that this species is closely related to other species of lizard that have two sexes and, in these other lizards that reproduce sexually, the sex of the lizards is determined by whether they produce eggs or sperm. In the New Mexico whiptail, the lizards all reproduce through eggs (they reproduce through a process called parthenogenesis, where eggs are either full clones or half clones of the original organism), so the reason why these lizards are considered female is because the other species they are closely related to have two sexes and the disappearance of the male sex likely happened only recently (the parent species likely had two sexes and the New Mexico whiptail still exhibit vestige behavior of mating as though there were two sexes). There are some issues with this classification, yeah, but it’s not entirely arbitrary either.

So now, there’s also a classification of sexual reproduction that involves two gamete that are mostly indistinguishable from each other, therefore there is no male or female sex.  This is called isogamy (“iso” meaning “equal” like isosceles triangle, which have two equal sides).  In isogamy, sex is usually named things like “+” and “-” or “a” and “alpha” (in yeast).

Anyway, there’s a ton more stuff on this, but bottom line is, classification and grouping of stuff is hard, especially for scientists and biologists who have to deal with really, really weird organisms that decided to evolve in pretty bizarre ways.  While the whole classification system for sex is a bit wonky and doesn’t always quite work, it’s not too bad and changes with new advancements to better reflect the world around us.

Also, it’s not “white scientists” just using and creating these definitions. There are tons of people from all sorts of backgrounds trying to pave their way into a profession that has been historically dominated by white, usually wealthy men.  This doesn’t mean modern science isn’t done by minority groups and it isn’t fair to claim that a big chunk of science (work on sex and reproduction, in this case) is done by only one group of individuals when these concepts are used and built upon by people of diverse backgrounds who are fighting to earn recognition and pave the way toward representation for others.

tldr; Sexual reproduction is probably a lot more complicated than you think and claiming that the sex binary method of classifying stuff is the product of while scientists kind of oversimplifies stuff and makes it seem as though minority scientists haven’t been contributing to the field


IF I DIE YOUNG
BURY ME IN ANIME
LAY ME DOWN ON A
BED OF SHOUJOU
SINK ME IN THE RIVER AT DAWN
SEND ME AWAY WITH THE WORDS OF A THEME SONG

Uhhh…I’m pretty sure this is a picture of a guy surrounded by moe and lolicon…

IF I DIE YOUNG

BURY ME IN ANIME

LAY ME DOWN ON A

BED OF SHOUJOU

SINK ME IN THE RIVER AT DAWN

SEND ME AWAY WITH THE WORDS OF A THEME SONG

Uhhh…I’m pretty sure this is a picture of a guy surrounded by moe and lolicon…

(Source: ch15, via holyshitbatman)

I’m having an espurresso this morning

I’m having an espurresso this morning

wannabeanimator:

I came across this article on Facebook and unfortunately I cannot translate (if you find a translation or post your own translation, please let me know!), but from what I read on Facebook, this article alludes to the possibility of Hayao Miyazaki working on a short film for the Ghibli Museum. This would come after other short films under the Ghibli Museum name, including Mei and the Kittenbus (2002) which was also directed by Miyazaki.

I’ll keep you posted as more news comes out.

I’m not translating this, since it would take 30-45 minutes, but yeah, basically this article is saying Ghibli isn’t disbanding, it’s just not working on full length films anymore.  Miyazaki also retired specifically from full length films, but did not retire from short films, so they are considering making a short film, but figuring out what to make the film on is difficult.

And then the third paragraph is about how animation is branching out from Japan to all of asia.  Ideas for a movie might start in Japan, but, for instance, be produced in Thailand.  That’s the way producer Suzuki (I think the quote is his, but I’d need to do a closer reading to make sure, since I don’t normally read newspapers in Japanese) thinks animation is currently going.  

The third paragraph is actually pretty interesting, but if it’s misinterpreted, there’s some danger that it could become a misquote or easily misinterpreted if the wording isn’t right, so I’ll translate that paragraph fully if someone asks, but otherwise it’d take 20+ minutes for work I’m not being paid for/am not sure anyone will read, so I don’t want to do it unless there’s someone who actually wants to know what it says and it hasn’t been translated already.

yukipri:

I see, Japan


They also have Olaf and Anna.
What happens to snowmen in summer?
They get eaten >:D

yukipri:

I see, Japan

They also have Olaf and Anna.

What happens to snowmen in summer?

They get eaten >:D

Bandai is starting preorders for sailor moon charm bracelets with an original gold plate that I would have no use for, yet I still want it…

Bandai is starting preorders for sailor moon charm bracelets with an original gold plate that I would have no use for, yet I still want it…

disneyvillainsforjustice:

-teesa-:

7.23.14

George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

"Another scene I remember now as an adult is every morning at school we started the day with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag…there was the American flag flying over the camp but I could also see the barbed wire fence and the sentry towers pointing at us from my schoolhouse window as I recited the words ‘With liberty and justice for all’." - George Takei, The Daily Show (July 24, 2014). 

Full Episode (apologies, The Daily Show website does not have the best video player). 

To Be Takei documentary official website. 

- Mod Dawes Sr. 

Another note: there’s some evidence that the internment camps were set up due to racism on the West coast.  There were people who thought Japanese immigrants were taking jobs away from “real” Americans, especially in agriculture, so WWII and Pearl Harbor were partially used as excuses for racism to be vented “legally.”

(via dragonfireandblood)